Hacker Community Espionage

I recently got to see a talk at the Chaos Communication Congress titled “When the Dutch secret service knocks on your door”, with the following description:

This is a story of when the Dutch secret service knocked on my door just after OHM2013, what some of the events that lead up to this, our guesses on why they did this and how to create an environment where we can talk about these things instead of keeping silent.

Since the talk was not recorded, the following is my synopsis and thoughts. This post was written about a week after the talk, so some facts may be distorted by poor memory recall.

  • The speaker was approached by members of the Dutch secret service at his parents’ house. They initially identified themselves as members of the department of the interior, but when asked whether they were part of the secret service, they capitulated.

  • The agents began by offering all-expenses-paid travel to any hackathon or hackerspace. All the speaker needed to do was write a report about their experience and send it back. A relatively harmless act, but it means they would be an unannounced informant in hacker communities.

  • When the author refused, the agents switched to harder recruitment techniques. They pursued the author at the gym, sat nearby in cafes when the author held meetings for nonprofits, and likely deployed an IMSI catcher to track them at a conference.

  • Eventually, the author got in contact with other members of the hacker community that had also been approached. Some of them went further through the recruitment process. The offers grew, including “attend our secret hacker summer camp, we’ll let you play with toys you’ve never heard of,” and “If you want to hack anything we can make sure the police never find out.” In either of these cases the recruit is further indebted to the secret service, either by signing NDAs or similar legal commitments to protect government secrets, or by direct threat, wherein the government can restore the recruit’s disappeared criminal charges at any time.

I have two chief concerns about this. First, given how blatant the secret service was in their recruitment attempts, and that we only heard about their attempts in December of 2017, we can safely assume many people accepted the government’s offer. Therefore, there are likely many informants working for the secret service already.

Second, this talk was about the Netherlands - a relatively small country not known for their excessive surveillance regimes like the Five Eyes. If the Netherlands has a large group of informants spying on hackerspaces and conferences around the globe, then many other countries will as well, not to mention more extreme measures likely taken by countries with more resources.

From this, we can conclude there are likely informants in every talk at significant conferences. Every hackerspace with more than token attendance is monitored. This is not unprecedented - the FBI had a vast array of informants during the COINTELPRO era that infiltrated leftist movements throughout the United States (along with much less savory groups like the KKK), and since shortly after 9/11 has used a large group of Muslim informants to search for would-be terrorists.

Posted 1/7/18